Articles

Inhibition of salivary amylase by black and green teas and their effects on the intraoral hydrolysis of starch.

Author

Zhang J, Kashket S

Date

1998

Journal

Caries Res

Abstract

Tea decoctions prepared from a number of black and green teas inhibited amylase in human saliva. Black teas gave higher levels of inhibition than green teas, and removal of tea tannins with gelatin led to the loss of inhibitory activity from all decoctions. Streptococcal amylase was similarly inhibited by tea decoctions. Fluoride was without effect on amylase. Since salivary amylase hydrolyzes food starch to low molecular weight fermentable carbohydrates, experiments were carried out to determine whether tea decoctions would interfere with the release of maltose in food particles that became entrapped on the dentition. Subjects consumed salted crackers and rinsed subsequently for 30 s with black or green tea decoctions, or water. Maltose release was reduced by up to about 70% after rinsing with the teas. Black tea decoction was significantly more effective than green tea, in agreement with the in vitro data. The observations supported the hypothesis that tea consumption can be effective in reducing the cariogenic potential of starch-containing foods such as crackers and cakes. Tea may reduce the tendency for these foods to serve as slow-release sources of fermentable carbohydrate.