Alstonia macrophylla Wall. ex G.Don

Last updated: 02 April 2015

Scientific Name

Alstonia macrophylla Wall. ex G.Don

Synonyms

Alstonia acuminata Miq., Alstonia batino Blanco, Alstonia brassii Monach., Alstonia costata Wall. ex Miq. [Illegitimate], Alstonia glabriflora Markgr., Alstonia oblongifolia Merr., Alstonia pangkorensis King & Gamble, Alstonia paucinervia Merr., Alstonia subsessilis Miq., Echites trifidus Blanco [Illegitimate] [1]

Vernacular

Malaysia Pulai penipu bukit (Peninsula); pulai daun besar, sayongan (Sabah); [2][3]pulai batu [4]
English Hard alstonia, hard milkwood, [2]devil tree [3]
Indonesia Pule batu (Ambon); kai riti (Seram); ai oi (Biak) [2] [3]
Thailand Thungfa, kra thungfa hai, teen thian (Peninsula) [2][3]
Philippines Batino (Tagalog, Bikol, Pangasinan); kuyau-kuyau (Bikol); itang-itang (Panay Bisaya) [2]
Vietnam s[uwx]a l[as] l[ows]n, m[ows]p l[as] to [2][3]
Papua New Guinea Ai wawoi (Papua); andelagar (Enga); dero (Madang) [2][3].

Geographical Distributions

Alstonia macrophylla From Sri Lanka and Nicobar Islands, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam to Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, Borneo (Sabah), the Philippines, the Moluccas and New Guinea. [2]

Botanical Description

A. macrophylla comes from the family of Apocynaceae. It is a small to medium-sized tree that can reach measures up to 30(-50) m tall, with straight bole, measuring up to 100 cm in diametre and sometimes fluted at the base or with small buttresses. The outer bark is blackish-brown to grey, smooth or rough, minutely scaly, tuberculate, or fissured while the inner bark is cream, with broken and orange-yellow laminations and without latex. [2]

The leaves are in whorls of 3-4, obovate or narrowly obovate, sometimes elliptical to narrowly elliptical, with a size of measuring 4.5-25(-32) cm x 1.5-10.5 cm, rounded to narrowly acuminate apex, with 12-25(-31) pairs of secondary veins while the petiole is measures 2-25 mm long. [2]

The inflorescence is with many-flowered and with measures 1-4 mm long pedicel. The sepal is puberulous to hairless while the inside of the petal is hairless. The follicles are smooth. [2]

Cultivation

A. macrophylla cultivated in India and Africa. It is grows in a wide range of vegetation types and soils in primary and disturbed forest ranging from flooded areas to montane forest, on soils ranging from sandy clay to limestone, from sea-level to about 2900 m altitude. [2]

Chemical Constituent

No documentation

Plant Part Used

No documentation

Traditional Use

No documentation

Preclinical Data

No documentation

Clinical Data

No documentation

Dosage

No documentation

Poisonous

No documentation

Line drawing

330

Figure 1: The line drawing of A. macrophylla Wallich ex G. Don. [2]

References

  1. The Plant List. Ver 1.1. Alstonia macrophylla Wall. ex G.Don [homepage on the Internet]. c2013. [updated 2012 March 23; cited 2015 April 02] Available from: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-7064
  2. Teo SP. Alstonia macrophylla Wallich ex G. Don. In: van Valkenburg JLCH, Bunyapraphatsara N, editors. Plant Resources of South-East Asia No. 12(2): Medicinal and poisonous plants 2. Leiden, Netherlands: Backhuys Publisher; 2001. p. 66-67.
  3. Philippines medicinal plants. Alstonia macrophylla Wallich ex G. Don. [homepage on the internet] c2014. [updated 2014; cited 2015 April 02] Available from http://www.stuartxchange.com/Batino.html
  4. Herbal Medicine Research Centre, Institute Medical Research. Compendium of Medicinal Plants Used in Malaysia. Vol. 1. Kuala Lumpur: HMRC-IMR; 2002. p. 36.