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Mastic

Plant Part Used

Resinous exudate from stem

Introduction

Mastic gum is obtained from a shrub found scattered over the Mediterranean region in Spain, Portugal, France, Greece, Turkey, Northern Africa and the Canary Islands. In addition to being a traditional medicinal agent, mastic gum has traditionally been used in the perfume industry and as chewing gum in many cultures.

Dosage Info

Dosage Range

500mg, 2-4 times a day for one month.

Most Common Dosage

500mg, 2 times a day for one month.

Standardization

[span class=doc]Standardization represents the complete body of information and controls that serve to enhance the batch to batch consistency of a botanical product, including but not limited to the presence of a marker compound at a defined level or within a defined range.[/span]

Not applicable.

Reported Uses

Mastic gum’s main potential benefit involves support of the stomach lining. Studies suggest that mastic may inhibit the growth of H. pylori, a bacterial invader that lives in the mucous of the stomach lining and can lead to stomach ulcers and other complications. (1) , (2)

Additionally, studies suggest that mastic gum may be able to exert overall protective support for the stomach lining and may provide benefit for patients with stomach ulcers. (3) It may also protect the body from various fungi and other bacteria. (4)

Toxicities & Precautions

Introduction

[span class=alert]Be sure to tell your pharmacist, doctor, or other health care providers about any dietary supplements you are taking. There may be a potential for interactions or side effects.[/span]

General

This dietary supplement is considered safe when used in accordance with proper dosing guidelines.

Allergy

Some individuals experience an allergic reaction when taking this dietary supplement. (5) Discontinue use and call your doctor or seek medical attention if you have fast or irregular breathing, skin rash, hives or itching.

Pregnancy/ Breast Feeding

To date, the medical literature has not reported any adverse effects related to fetal development during pregnancy or to infants who are breast-fed. Yet little is known about the use of this dietary supplement while pregnant or breast-feeding. Therefore, it is recommended that you inform your healthcare practitioner of any dietary supplements you are using while pregnant or breast-feeding.

Age Limitations

To date, the medical literature has not reported any adverse effects specifically related to the use of this dietary supplement in children. Since young children may have undiagnosed allergies or medical conditions, this dietary supplement should not be used in children under 10 years of age unless recommended by a physician.

References

  1. Huwez FU, et al. Mastic gum kills Helicobacter pylori. N Engl J Med. Dec1998;339(26):1946.
  2. Huwez FU, Al-Habbal MJ. Mastic in treatment of benign gastric ulcers. Gastroenterol Japon. 1986;21:273–74.
  3. View Abstract: Al-Said MS, Ageel AM, Parmar NS, et al. Evaluation of mastic, a crude drug obtained from Pistacia lentiscus for gastric and duodenal anti-ulcer activity. J Ethnopharmacol. 1986;15:271–78.
  4. View Abstract: Iauk L, et al. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Pistacia lentiscus L. extracts: preliminary report. J Chemother. Jun1996;8(3):207-9.
  5. View Abstract: Keynan N, et al. Allergenicity of the pollen of Pistacia. Allergy. Mar 1997;52(3):323-30.

 

 

 

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