Mu Tong

Akebiae Caulis

Editors Note: The FDA has restricted the use of this product, due to potential damage to the kidneys. This formula is not recommended for use.
, Akebia

Dosage

3-6g, decoction, pill, or powder.

Chemical Composition

Saponin A-G; Akeboside E; Betulin; Oleanolic acid; Hederagenin; Stigmasterol; b-sitosterol; Daucoterol; Inositol; Cyanidin-3-xylglucoside; Cyanidin-3-p-coumaroy glucoside; Cyanidin-3-p-coumaroyl-xyl-glucoside. (1) , (2) , (3) , (4) , (5) , (6) , (7) , (8)

Precautions

Pregnant women and patients suffering from spermatorrhea, weak qi or thirst due to impairment to the body fluid should use Mu Tong with caution.

Pharmacology

Antibacterial effects

Experiments on the adherence of Neisseria gonorrheae to human urethra epithelial cells show that Mu Tong can significantly decrease the number of NG adhered to the surface of human urethra epithelial cells, and help keep the host organism relatively intact. (9)

Counteracting Fu Zi’s toxicity

Clinical trials show that in using Fu Zi to treat bi syndromes due to wind-dampness, adding a small amount of Mu Tong not only increases the effectiveness of the treatment, it also prevents Fu Zi poisoing. Toxicity tests also confirm Mu Tong’s effect of counteracting Fu Zi’s acute toxicity: In combined use of Fu Zi and Mu Tong, up to a certain level, the combination’s LD50 value increases with the increase of Mu Tong. Research further finds that in the presence of Mu Tong, Fu Zi has a significantly lower level of biological alkaloids. (10)

Promoting lactation

Experiments show that Mu Tong can increase lactating rats’ bodyweight, increase milk secretion, and promote mammary gland proliferation. (11)

References

  1. Ma Shuang Cheng, et al. The chemical composition of Akebia (I). Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1994;25(4):171-174.
  2. Ma Shuang Cheng, et al. The chemical composition of Akebia (II). Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1994;25(11):613, 616.
  3. Ma Shuang Cheng, et al. The chemical composition of Akebia (III). Journal of Research and Development of Natural Resources. 1998;10(3):49-51.
  4. Ma Shuang Cheng, et al. Using TLC scanner to determine the content of akeboside E in Akebia. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1992;23(11):573-574.
  5. Ma Shuang Cheng, et al. The structure of akeboside E in Akebia. Journal of Pharmacy. 1994;29(2):285-289.
  6. Zhang Jing Song, et al. The polysaccharides of Mu Tong. Journal of Pharmacy. 1997;32(6):438-441.
  7. Ma Shuang Cheng, et al. The chemical composition of the fruit peel of Mu Tong. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1993;24(11):563-566.
  8. Editorial Committee of Chinese Materia Medica. State Drug Administration of China. Chinese Materia Medica. Shanghai: Science and Technology Press; 1998.
  9. Wu Xi Guang, et al. The effects of eight Chinese herbs on the adhesion of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. China Journal of Dermatology. 1992;25(6):372-374.
  10. Ding Guo Ming, et al. Mu Tong’s antidotal effect on Fu Zi. China Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1992;17(5):310-312.
  11. Li Guang Ze, etal. The pharmacology of lactation-promoting medicine. Journal of New Chinese Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology. 1995;6(1):31-33.