Bian Xu

Herba Polygoni Avicularis, Polygonum erectum

Dosage

Internal administration: 10-15g, decoction, pill or powder. 5:1 concentrated extract: 2-3 grams/day.

Toxicity

LD50 (mice): 78.48 ± 1.23g/kg (water-based decoction/hypodermic injection); 1.173g/kg (avicularin/intraperitoneal injection). (1) , (2)

Chemical Composition

Quercetin; Avicularin; Quercitrin; Vitexin; Isovitexin; Luteolin; Rhamnetin-3-galactoside; Hyperin; Umbelliferone; Scopoletin; Ferulic acid; Sinapic acid; Vanillic acid; Syringic acid; Melilotic acid; P-coumaric acid; P-hydroxybenzoic acid; Gentisic acid; Caffeic acid; Protocatechuic acid; Gallic acid; P-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid; Chlorogenic acid; Salicylic acid; Ellagic acid; catechin; Oxalic acid; Silicic acid; Methionine; Proline; Serine; Threonine; Tyrosine; Phenylalanine; Cystine; Arginine; Valine; Glycine; Leucine; Lysine; Isoleucine; Tryptophan; Glucose; Fructose; Sucrose. (3)

Precautions

Exercise caution when prescribing Bian Xu for patients with spleen and stomach deficiencies, or for patients with yin deficiency.

Pharmacology

Diuretic effect

When administered to rats by intraperitoneal infusion at 20g/kg, or by hypodermic injection at 1g/kg or 5g/kg,a water-based decoction of Bian Xu has a pronounced diuretic effect. (4) Another study has also shown that when administed to anaesthetized dogs by IV injection at 0.5mg/kg, avicularin is shown to have a diuretic effect, and the effect appears to become more pronounced as the dose increases. (5)

Cholagogic effect

Avicularin is shown to have a cholagogic effect in dogs and rats. Administered to dogs by IV injection, avicularin can increase the excretion of bile salt, with the median effective dose being 2.57-4.26mg/kg. (6)

Bacteriostatic effect

Experiments show that a water-based decoction of Bian Xu with a concentration level of 25% can inhibit Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei. When the concentration level is increased to 100%, it can inhibit Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus diphtheriae. (7) , (8)

Other effects

Bian Xu is shown to have a protective effect on animals against radiation. (9) At 50mg/ml, Bian Xu can lower the activity of ALT in rats of dextroaminogalactose-induced liver damages. (10)

References

  1. Huang Hou Pin, et al. Bian Xu’s diuretic effect. Journal of Guiyang Medical College. 1963:36.
  2. Ke Ming Qing. Physiochemical and pharmacological properties of active components of Chinese material medica, 2nd edition. Hunan Science and Technology Press. 1982.
  3. Editorial Committee of Chinese Materia Medica, State Drug Administration of China. Chinese Materia Medica. Shanghai Science and Technology Press, 1998.
  4. Huang Hou Pin, et al. Bian Xu’s diuretic effect. Journal of Guiyang Medical College. 1963:36.
  5. Ke Ming Qing. Physiochemical and pharmacological properties of active components of Chinese material medica, 2nd edition. Hunan Science and Technology Press. 1982.
  6. Ke Ming Qing. Physiochemical and pharmacological properties of active components of Chinese material medica, 2nd edition. Hunan Science and Technology Press. 1982.
  7. Internal Medicine Section, Hubei Medical College Hospital. Treating bacterial diarrhea with Bian Xu. Hubei Journal of Health. 1972;(5):41.
  8. Epidemic Prevention Center of Lingling District (Hunan). Chinese herbs’ bacteriostatic effect: The screening 561 herbs. Hunan Journal of Medicine. 1974;(5):57.
  9. Liu Qing Zeng, et al. Chinese medicine’s protective effect against radiation. Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1989;14(4):246-248.
  10. Wang Li Ming, et al. The effect of 10 herbs on CCl4- or galactose-damaged liver cells in rats. Journal of Zhejiang Medical University, 1994;23(3):109-113.