Feverfew in the prevention of migraines.

Date:

01-Dec-2005

Source

Cephalalgia

Related Monographs

Consumer Data: Feverfew Migraine
Professional Data: Feverfew Migraine

Article

Migraine may be classified as migraine without aura, formerly called common migraine, or migraine with aura, formerly known as classic migraine. The differences are based upon the presence or absence of neurologic symptoms prior to the onset of headache. The aura may consist of flashing lights, or zigzag lines, or may manifest as blind spots in the vision. Some people even experience speech difficulty, tingling in the face or hands, confusion, or weakness of an arm or leg. The majority of people suffering from classic migraine have an aura that develops 10-30 minutes prior to development of the actual headache. According to recent studies, the aura is believed to be the response to a trigger that creates a neuronal depression. This may result in as much as a 25-35 percent reduction in cerebral blood flow, and is certainly enough to cause the symptoms associated with the aura.

Feverfew has gained immense popularity because of its effectiveness in relieving migraine headaches. It can take time for this herb to work, so staying on it for a minimum of a month is recommended for proper activity. A recent study published in Cephalalgia, investigated the role of feverfew in migraines. A total of 170 migraine sufferers participated, 89 received a feverfew extract, and 81 received placebo. The feverfew used in this study was MIG-99 and 6.25 mg were taken three times daily. Participants were followed up at 2 and 3 months. The results showed that those taking the feverfew had a lower frequency of migraine than those who received placebo. Safety and adverse events were also observed. The authors concluded that this feverfew was effective and showed a good benefit-risk ratio.1

References

1. Diener HC, et al. Efficacy and safety of 6.25 mg t.i.d. feverfew CO2-extract (MIG-99) in migraine prevention – a randomized, double-blind, multicentre, placebo-controlled study. Cephalalgia. Nov 2005;25(11):1031.