Singapore

Policy

The Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners Act of 2000 covers regulations regarding use and practice of TM/CAM. A national office has been established by the Ministry of Health which oversees the national policy.

SINGAPORE POLICY

Contact

Center for Pharmaceutical Administration 
Health Sciences Authority 
No. 2, Jalan Bukit Merah, Block 4 Singapore, 169547 
Tel:63255609 
Website: http://www.hsa.gov.sg

 

Singapore Traditional and Complementary Medicine Policy

In Singapore, western medicine is the mainstream medicine being practiced. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is currently the only form of traditional/ complementary medicine that has statutory regulation. The implementing agency in Singapore is the TCM unit under the Ministry of Health Singapore that was established in year 1995.

Contact Details

Traditional & Complementary Medicine Branch
Primary and Community Care Division
Ministry of Health Singapore
College of Medicine Building
16 College Road
Singapore 169854
Tel: +65 6325 9220
Fax: +65 6325 9499
Website: http://www.moh.gov.sg

Reference:

Ministry of Health. Healthcare services. Last accessed on 23 October 2012 at http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/home/our_healthcare_system/Healthcare_Services.html

 

Laws & Regulations

Health supplements are regulated by the Health Supplements Unit, Center for Pharmaceutical Administration. The Medicines Act of 1975 and its Subsidiary Legislation covers all traditional medicines, dietary supplements, homeopathic medicines and drugs.  To be categorized as health supplements, the delivery system must be in the form of tablets, capsules, soft gels, powders, liquids, elixirs, syrups and granules.  Other acceptable forms include tea bags, oral and nasal sprays and trans-dermal patches. Health supplements are intended to supplement the diet or to promote health and well-being.

Health supplements must be registered unless there is a pre-existing exemption. All products are classified into one of three categories:  Health foods with vague or general medicinal claims, Quasi-medicinal Products or Traditional Medicines. Legislation lists a variety of ingredients that are restricted. This list changes as new ingredients are added and others removed.

Herbal medicines, including Chinese Proprietary Medicines, fall under national regulations. Manufacturing regulations for these medicines are the same as for conventional pharmaceutical products.  Manufacturers and all sellers must be licensed and marketing must be pre-approved.  There is no legally binding pharmacopoeia presently used.

A post-marketing surveillance system tracking adverse events is in place.

The Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners Act of 2000 covers regulations regarding use and practice of TM/CAM.

 

SINGAPORE LAWS AND REGULATIONS

Contact

Center for Pharmaceutical Administration
Health Sciences Authority                     
Number 2 Jalan Bukit Merah,
Block 4 Singapore, 169547 

Tel: 63255609   

URL: www.hsa.gov.sg

 

Singapore Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners Act 2000

The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Practitioners Act was passed in 2000. Under the Act, the TCM Practitioners Board (TCMPB) was set up in 2001 to register TCM practitioners in phases, starting with acupuncturists in 2001 followed by TCM physicians in 2002, to provide accreditation to TCM institutions and TCM courses for the purpose of registration and also to regulate the professional ethics and conduct of registered TCM practitioners. The regulation of TCM practitioners is accomplished under the Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners Act 2000 with the following subsidiary legislations:

  • Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners (Registration of Acupuncturists) Regulations 2001;
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners (Register and Practising Certificates) Regulations 2001;
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners (Practice, Conduct and Ethics) Regulations 2001;
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners (Investigation of Complaints) Regulations 2001; and
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners (Registration of Traditional Chinese Medicine Physicians) Regulations 2002.

Contact Details

81 Kim Keat Road, 
#09-00, Singapore 328836
Tel: + 65 6355 2488
Fax: + 65 6355 2489
Website: http://www.healthprofessionals.gov.sg/

Reference:

Ministry of Health. TCM Practitioners. Last accessed on 23 October 2012 at http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/tcmpractitioners.html

Singapore Endangered Species (Import and Export) Act

Under the Endangered Species (Import and Export) Act, the import and export of CITES-listed plants and animals including their parts and derivatives require a permit from the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA). Singapore became a Signatory to CITES in November 1986 and the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority is the Management Authority responsible for the implementation and enforcement of CITES in Singapore.

Contact Details

Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority (headquarters)
5 Maxwell Road,
#01-01 / #02-03 / #03-00 / #04-00 / #18-00
Tower Block, MND Complex
Singapore 069110
Tel: +65 63257625
Fax: +65 62235383
Website: http://www.ava.gov.sg

Reference:

Authority of Singapore. Agri-Food & Veterinary. Last accessed on 23 October 2012 at http://www.ava.gov.sg/AnimalsPetSector/CITESEndangeredSpecies/ and http://www.ava.gov.sg/AgricultureFisheriesSector/ImportExportTransOfPlants/