Eleuthero, Siberian Ginseng

Plant Part Used

Root

Introduction

Eleuthero is one of the top selling herbal products in the United States. It is a member of the ginseng family, but it is of a different genus than other popular ginsengs. The use of eleuthero root dates back 2,000 years in the records of Chinese medicine when it was used for respiratory tract infections, as well as colds and flu. The Chinese also believed that eleuthero provided energy and vitality. In Russia, the people of Siberia originally used it to increase physical performance and quality of life.

Interactions and Depletions

Interactions

Dosage Info

Dosage Range

100-200mg (standardized extract), 2-3 times daily. A regimen of 4 weeks on, 2 weeks off is recommended for maximum benefits.

Most Common Dosage

200mg (standardized extract), 2 times a day. A regimen of 4 weeks on, 2 weeks off is recommended for maximum benefits.

Standardization

[span class=doc]Standardization represents the complete body of information and controls that serve to enhance the batch to batch consistency of a botanical product, including but not limited to the presence of a marker compound at a defined level or within a defined range.[/span]

The most current available medical and scientific literature indicates that this dietary supplement should be standardized to 0.8% eleutherosides B and E per dose.

Reported Uses

Eleuthero has been reported to increase stamina and endurance and protect the body systems against stress-induced illness and fatigue. (1) , (2) , (3) Scientists refer to eleuthero as an adaptogen, meaning it has the ability to boost nonspecific resistance of the body to a wide range of chemical, physical, psychological, and biological stressors.

The adaptogenic properties of eleuthero have been extensively investigated in Russia. Studies conducted there have found that ginseng may offer a wide range of benefits. Some of these include:

 

Toxicities & Precautions

Introduction

[span class=alert]Be sure to tell your pharmacist, doctor, or other health care providers about any dietary supplements you are taking. There may be a potential for interactions or side effects.[/span]

General

This dietary supplement is considered safe when used in accordance with proper dosing guidelines.

Health Conditions

If you have hypertension, long term use of this dietary supplement is not recommended. (15) If you have a bleeding disorder, an active infection or fever talk to your doctor before taking this dietary supplement.

Side Effects

Side effects are possible with any dietary supplement. This dietary supplement may cause hypertension, insomnia, irritability, anxiety and elevated heart rate. (16) Tell your doctor if these side effects become severe or do not go away.

Pregnancy/ Breast Feeding

This dietary supplement should not be used if you are pregnant or breast-feeding an infant. (17)

Age Limitations

To date, the medical literature has not reported any adverse effects specifically related to the use of this dietary supplement in children. Since young children may have undiagnosed allergies or medical conditions, this dietary supplement should not be used in children under 10 years of age unless recommended by a physician.

References

  1. View Abstract: Fulder SJ. Ginseng and the Hypothalamic-pituitary Control of Stress. Am J Chin Med. 1981;9(2):112-18.
  2. Asano K, et al. Effect of Eleutherococcus senticosus Extract on Human Physical Working Capacity. Planta Med. 1986;3:175-77.
  3. View Abstract: Hartz AJ. Randomized controlled trial of Siberian ginseng for chronic fatigue. Psychol Med. 2004 Jan;34(1):51-61.
  4. View Abstract: Hikino H, et al. Isolation and Hypoglycemic Activity of Eleutherans A, B, C, D, E, F and G: Glycans of Eleutherococcus senticosus Roots. J Nat Prod. 1986;49(2):293-97.
  5. Farnsworth NR, et al. Siberian Ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus): Current Status as an Adaptogen. In: Economics and Medicinal Plant Research. Vol 1. London: Academic Press; 1985:155-209.
  6. View Abstract: Hikino H, et al. Isolation and Hypoglycemic Activity of Eleutherans A, B, C, D, E, F and G: Glycans of Eleutherococcus senticosus Roots. J Nat Prod. 1986;49(2):293-97.
  7. View Abstract: Minkova M, et al. Effect of Eleutherococcus Extract on the Radioprotective Action of Adeturone. Acta Physiol Pharmacol Bulg. 1987;13(4):66-70.
  8. Tenchova VB, et al. Changes in Hemopoiesis in the Rat as a Result of Combined Exposure to Acceleration, Irradiation and Radiation-modifying Agents. Kosm Biol Aviakosm Med. 1987;21(2):85-86.
  9. View Abstract: Maslova LV, et al. Cardioprotective Effects of Adaptogens of Plant Origin. Biull Eksp Biol Med. 1993;115(3):269-71.
  10. View Abstract: Bohn B, et al. Flow-cytometric Studies with Eleutherococcus senticosus Extract as an Immunomodulatory Agent. Arzneimittelforschung. 1987;37(10):1193-96.
  11. View Abstract: Kupin VI, et al. Stimulation of the Immunological Reactivity of Cancer Patients by Eleutherococcus Extract. Vopr Onkol. 1986;32(7):21-26.
  12. Farnsworth NR, et al. Siberian Ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus): Current Status as an Adaptogen. In: Economics and Medicinal Plant Research. Vol 1. London: Academic Press; 1985:155-209.
  13. View Abstract: Filaretov AA, et al. Effect of Adaptogens on the Activity of the Pituitary-adrenocortical System in Rats. Biull Eksp Biol Med. 1986;101(5):573-74.
  14. Sosnova TL. The Effect of Eleutherococcus spinosus on the Color Discrimination Function of the Visual Analyzer in Persons with Normal Trichromatic Vision. Vestn Oftalmol. 1969;82(5):59-61.
  15. PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company; 2000:694.
  16. Farnsworth NR, et al. Siberian Ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus): Current Status as an Adaptogen. In: Economics and Medicinal Plant Research. Vol 1. London: Academic Press; 1985:155-209.
  17. View Abstract: Chan LY, et al. An in-vitro study of ginsenoside Rb1-induced teratogenicity using a whole rat embryo culture model. Hum Reprod. Oct 2003;18(10):2166-8.