Horsetail

Plant Part Used

Shoots

Introduction

Horsetail is a plant found throughout the Northern Hemisphere in Asia, Europe, and North America. Horsetail’s therapeutic uses date back to the ancient Romans and Greeks, where it was used as a remedy to stop bleeding, and to treat ulcers, wounds, and inflammation of the skin. Horsetail contains silicon, silica and silicic acid, of which a portion contains elemental silicon, a vital element for healthy tissues and organs of the body including the skin, hair, nails, teeth, bones, tendons and ligaments. Because it can support healthy skin, it is commonly an ingredient in many types of skin-care products.

Dosage Info

Dosage Range

300-600mg, 3 times a day.

Topical Compress: Use 1 heaping teaspoonful, apply as needed.

Tea: One cup of tea taken between mealtimes using 2 to 3 gm herb per cup. (1)

Infusion: 1.5 gm herb per cup. (2)

Liquid extract: 1 to 4 ml, 3 times daily at a ratio of 1:1. (3)

 

Most Common Dosage

300mg, 3 times a day.

Topical Compress:Use 1 heaping teaspoonful, apply as needed.

Tea: One cup of tea taken between mealtimes using 2 gm herb per cup.

Infusion: 1.5 gm herb per cup.

Liquid extract: 1 ml, 3 times daily at a ratio of 1:1.

Standardization

[span class=doc]Standardization represents the complete body of information and controls that serve to enhance the batch to batch consistency of a botanical product, including but not limited to the presence of a marker compound at a defined level or within a defined range.[/span]

The most current available medical and scientific literature indicates that this dietary supplement should be standardized to 10% silicic acid per dose.

Reported Uses

Horsetail’s silicon component is known for its potential support of healthy bones, skin, cartilage ligaments and other connective tissues. (4) Because the degradation of connective tissue is commonly associated with the aging process, silicon may also possess anti-aging properties. (5)

Other studies suggest that horsetail may have a mild diuretic action. (6) Modern research backs up its ancient applications; horsetail may aid in the treatment of external wounds and in the control of bleeding. (7)

Toxicities & Precautions

Introduction

[span class=alert]Be sure to tell your pharmacist, doctor, or other health care providers about any dietary supplements you are taking. There may be a potential for interactions or side effects.[/span]

General

This dietary supplement is considered safe when used in accordance with proper dosing guidelines. (8)

Pregnancy/ Breast Feeding

To date, the medical literature has not reported any adverse effects related to fetal development during pregnancy or to infants who are breast-fed. Yet little is known about the use of this dietary supplement while pregnant or breast-feeding. Therefore, it is recommended that you inform your healthcare practitioner of any dietary supplements you are using while pregnant or breast-feeding.

Age Limitations

To date, the medical literature has not reported any adverse effects specifically related to the use of this dietary supplement in children. Since young children may have undiagnosed allergies or medical conditions, this dietary supplement should not be used in children under 10 years of age unless recommended by a physician.

References

  1. PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2nd edition. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company; 2000:410.
  2. PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2nd edition. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company; 2000:410.
  3. PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2nd edition. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company; 2000:410.
  4. Harmon NW. Equisetum arvense. Pharm J. 1992;399:413-415.
  5. Carlisle EM. The nutritional essentiality of silicon. Nutr Rev. Jul1982;40(7):193-8.
  6. Bradley PR, ed. British Herbal Compendium, vol. 1. Bournemouth:British Herbal Medicine Association. 1992;92-93.
  7. Bradley PR, ed. British Herbal Compendium, vol. 1. Bournemouth:British Herbal Medicine Association. 1992;92-93.
  8. Bradley PR, ed. British Herbal Compendium, vol. 1. Bournemouth:British Herbal Medicine Association. 1992;92-93.