Chuan Bei Mu

Bulbus Fritillariae Cirrhosae, Sichuan Fritillary Bulb

Dosage

3-9g decoction or 1-1.5g pill or powder is orally taken.

Toxicity

LD50 (mice/abdominal injection): 13.71 ( 1.24g/kg (alcohol-based extract of Hubei Bei Mu); >50g/kg (alcohol-based extract of Chuan Bei Mu). The minimum lethal dosage for oral administration of alcohol-based extract of Hui Bei Mu is 40g/kg. (1) The maximum tolerance dosage (MTD) is more than 60g per kg body weight, corresponding to 480 times the recommended human dosage; therefore, taken orally, Bei Mu is generally considered to be of an extremely low level of toxicity. (2)

Chemical Composition

Fritimine; Sipeimine; Songbeisine; Sonbeinine; Sucrose; Stearic acid; Palmitic acid; b-sitosterol; Delavine; Delavinone; Chuanbeinone; Delafrine; Delafrinone; Peimisine; Imperialine; Fritiminine; Sipemine; Minpeimine; Minpeiminine; Chuanbeinone; Delavinone; Sipeimine; Saponin; Ebeiedine; Ebeiedinone; Ebeinine; Ebeinone; Adenosine; Galacto-alcohol; Succinic acid; Taipaienine (I); Chuanbeinone (II); Imperialine (III); Verticinone (IV); Peimisine (V); Isoverticine (VI); Ent-kauran-16¦Â,17-diol; Ent-kauran-3¦Â,16¦Â,17-triol; Ent-3¦Â-acetoxy-kauran-16¦Â,17-diol; (22R, 25S)-solanid-5-enine-3 (, 5 (, 6 (-triol Ent-kauran-16¦Â-hydroxy-17-chloride (fritillaziebinol); (22R, 25S)-solanidane-3 ( -ol (I), thymidine (II) and adenosine (III). (3) , (4) , (5) , (6) , (7) , (8) , (9) , (10) , (11) , (12) , (13)

Inorganic Chemicals

K, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Cd, Zn, Mn.

Precautions

Patients suffering from spleen-yang insufficiency, cold phlegm, and damp phlegm should use with caution. The herb is incompatible with aconite root (Radix Aconiti).

Pharmacology

Effects on the respiratory system

Experiments show that both cultivated and wild Chuan Bei Mu has a significant dosage-dependent antitussive effect on ammonia-induced cough in mice. Both cultivated and wild Chuan Bei Mu also have an dosage-dependent expectorant effect. (14) Furthermore, research has confirmed that variations of Bei Mu from various other areas unvaryingly has the same significant antitussive and expectorant effects. (15) , (16) Only when it comes to raising the cAMP level in mice and arresting cough in guinea pigs, does the difference between cultivated Bei Mu and wild Bei Mu appear to be significant, with the effect of the former being more pronounced than that of the latter. (17)

Effects on smooth muscles

Alcohol-based extract and total alkaloids (with a concentration from 0.004g /ml to 0.04g/ml of dried herb) of Hu Bei Bei Mu can relax the isolated ileum of guinea pigs and expand the blood vessels of isolated rabbit ears. (18)

Lowering blood pressure

Administered to cats by IV injection at 30mg/cat, total alkaloids of Hubei Bei Mu can lower the blood pressure for a short duration, as well as decrease the heart rate. (19)

Anti-ulcerous effects

The total alkaloids of Ping Bei Mu have an inhibitory effect on pyloric ligation-induced ulcers and stress ulcers in rats. (20)

Anti-neoplastic effects

Tu Bei Mu has a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of cancerous GRC-1 in in vitro-cultured human kidney granular cells, and induce the cancerous cells to die. Using flow cytometry to analyze the change in cell before and after treatment, it is found that Tu Bei Mu can keep GRC-1 and RLC-310 from progressing from the G0/G1 stage to the S stage, inhibit DNA synthesis, and lower the DNA index (P

Effects on the immune system

Tu Bei Mu saponin A ip 2mg/kg significantly increases the number of plaque-forming cells in the spleen of mice (P

Other effects

Oral administration of alcohol-based extract of Chuan Bei Mu and Hu Bei Bei Mu can significantly enhance mice's tolerance for oxygen deprivation under normal pressure and prolong their survival time. Hubei Bei Mu has a significant mydriatic effect in rabbits. (21)

References

  1. Wang Li Yan, et al. Chinese Pharmacology Bulletin. 1988;4(6):375-368.
  2. Mo Zhen Ji, et al. China Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1998;23(1):14-16.
  3. Chen Lu Kun, et al. Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine Material. 1989;12(9):45-46.
  4. Yan Zong Hong, et al. Journal of Shanghai Second Medical University. 1999;19(6):487-489, 507.
  5. Xu Shi Chun, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1990;21(1):2-6.
  6. Xu Shi Chun, et al. Journal of Botany. 1990;32(12):929.
  7. Xu Dong Ming, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1991;22(3):132-139.
  8. Zhong Feng Lin, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1992;23(4):180-181.
  9. Zhang Ping, et al. China Journal of Hospital Pharmacy. 1993;13(8):348-349.
  10. Hu Cheng Hao, et al. Journal of Pharmacology. 1993;28(7):516-521.
  11. Wu Xu Zhou, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1999;30(110):804-807.
  12. Li Ping, et al. Journal of University of Pharmacology of China. 1994;25(10):7-8.
  13. Cui Dong Ping, et al. China Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1995;20(5):298.
  14. Zhu an Ni, et al. Journal of University of Pharmacology of China. 1992;23(2):118-121.
  15. Yao Li Na, et al. Journal of Tongji Medical University. 1993;22(1):47-49.
  16. Li Ping, et al. Journal of University of Pharmacology of China. 1993;24(5):360-362.
  17. Mu Zhen Ji, et al. China Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1998;23(1):14-16.
  18. Xiong Wei, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1986;17(3):19.
  19. Xiong Wei, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1986;17(3):19.
  20. Zhao Xue Ming, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1988;19(3):124-125.
  21. Xiong Wei, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1986;17(3):19.