Lian Qiao

Forsythiae Fructus, Forsythia

Dosage

Decoction 6-15g.

Toxicity

LD50 (mice/herb decoction): 172.21g/kg (oral feeding); 20.96 ( 1.82g/kg) (abdominal injection). (1)

Chemical Composition

Forsythin (phillyrin); Phillygenin; Pinoresinol; Pinoresinol-(-D-glucoside; Rutin; Forsythoside; Suspensaside; Salidroside; Cornoside; Rengyol; Isorengyol; Rengyoside A, B, C; Betulinic acid; Oleanolic acid; Ursolic acid; (-amyrin acetate; Isobauerenyl acetate; Rengy-olester; 20(S)-dammar-24-ene-3 (,20-diol-3-acetate. (2) , (3) , (4) , (5) , (6) , (7) , (8) , (9)

Inorganic Chemicals

Zn, Fe, Mn, Cu, Co, Ni.

Precautions

Exercise caution when administering to patients with spleen and stomach deficiencies.

Pharmacology

Anti-microorganism effect

In-vitro experiments show that Lian Qiao has an inhibitory effect on a number of pathogenic bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, hemolytic streptococcus, Bacilli dysenteriae, typhoid bacillus, and proteus. (10)

Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic effects

Lian Qiao can inhibit inflammatory exudate and edema. (11) Methanol-based extract of Lian Qiao has anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. (12)

Protecting the liver

Administered to mice with CCl4-induced liver damages, Lian Qiao can lower the content of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, lessen the degeneration of liver cells, and restore hepatic glycogen and ribonucleic acid to the normal levels. (13)

Anti-emetic effect

Experiments show that Lian Qiao has a significant anti-emetic effect on digitalis-induced vomiting in pigeons, and on apomorphine-induced vomiting in dogs. (14)

Effects on the cardiovascular system

Administered by IV injection to dogs and rabbits under anesthesia, Lian Qiao can significantly lower their blood pressure. Administered to cats with endotoxin-induced low blood pressure, however, Lian Qiao can significantly raise their blood pressure. (15)

Other effects

Experiments show that Lian Qiao has a significant anti-oxidation effect and possibly an anti-allergic effect. (16) , (17)

References

  1. Wang Yao Xian. Journal of Pharmacology and Clinical Application of TCM. 1989;5(6):23.
  2. Editorial Committee of Chinese Materia Medica. State Drug Administration of China. Chinese Materia Medica. Shanghai: Science and Technology Press; 1998.
  3. Liu Jian Cheng, et al. Journal of Suzhou Medical College. 1998;18(9):924.
  4. Liu Jian Cheng, et al. Journal of Suzhou Medical College. 1998;18(11):1140.
  5. Zhu Qin Yu, et al. Journal of Suzhou Medical College. 1998;18(11):1141.
  6. Chen Yu Jun, et al. China Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1999;24(5):296.
  7. Wang Wei Fang, et al. Journal of Shengyang University of Pharmacy. 1999;16(2):138.
  8. Zhou Jia, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1999;30(9):661-663.
  9. Guo Mei, et al. Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicinal Material. 1999;22(10):497-498.
  10. Ma Zhen Ya. Shannxi Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Herbs. 1982;(4):58.
  11. Ma Zhen Ya. Shannxi Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Herbs. 1982;(4):58.
  12. Rui Jing. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1999;30(1):43-45.
  13. Group of Liver Diseases. Shanxi College of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Journal of Modern Medicine. 1973;(9):21.
  14. Editorial Committee of Chinese Materia Medica. State Drug Administration of China. Chinese Materia Medica. Shanghai: Science and Technology Press; 1998.
  15. Li Chang Cheng. China Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1990;15(9):47.
  16. Editorial Committee of Chinese Materia Medica. State Drug Administration of China. Chinese Materia Medica. Shanghai: Science and Technology Press; 1998.
  17. Long Sheng Jing, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1999;30(1):40-43.