Du Huo

Angelicae Pubescentis Radix, Pubescent Angelica Root

Dosage

Decoction: 3-10g.

Toxicity

LD50: (Hamsters/intramuscular injection): 160mg/kg (xanthotoxin); 945mg/kg (bergapten) (1)

Chemical Composition

Columbianetin; Columbianetin acetate; Osthole; Isoimperatorin; Bergapten; Xanthotoxin; Columbianadin; Anpubesol; Angelol D, G, B; g-aminobutyric acid; Eremophilene; Thymol; a-cedrene; Humulene; P-cresol; b-cedrene; Dodecyl isopropyl ether; a-longipinene; Sylvestrene; a-pinene; 3-methylnonane; Nerolidol; P-cymene; a-phelladrene; Bergapten; Isopimpinellin; Angelicin; Isobergapten; Sphondin; Piminellin; Ferulic acid; Palmitic acid; Stearic acid; Lignoceric acid; b-sitosterol; Falcarindiol; Oxocyclohexandecan-2-one; Columbianetin-(-D-glucopyrnoside; 4, 4'-methylenehis(2, 3, 5, 6-tetramethyl)phenol. (2) , (3) , (4) , (5) , (6) , (7) , (8) , (9) , (10) , (11)

Precautions

Exercise caution when applying to patients with yin deficiency and blood-dryness. One case of aphonia (loss of voice) has been reported. (12)

Pharmacology

Inhibiting blood plate aggregation

Research shows that alcohol-based extract of Du Huo (H6F4) has an inhibitory effect on blood platelet aggregation, and the inhibition rate increases with the increase in extract concentration - at the concentrations of 0.9, 1.8, and 2.7mg/ml, the inhibition rate was measured to be 22.6 (0.6%), 49.2 (10.7%), and 69 (12.3%), respectively. (13)

Anticoagulation

H6F4 has an anticoagulant effect, and the effect intensifies as the dosage increases. Du Huo can also partially dissolve fibrin. (14)

Effects on various receptors and enzymes

Research shows that methylene chloride-based extract of Du Huo has an inhibitory effect on a number of receptors and enzymes, including stabilization receptors, adrenaline receptors, angiotensin II receptors, HMG-CoA, and cholecystokinin receptors. (15)

Anti-arrhythmia

H6F6, water-based extract of Du Huo, has an anti-arrhythmia effect, and it can counteract aconitine-induced ventricular arrhythmia in mice, and arrhythmia in hamsters. (16)

Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects

Experiments on hamsters show that Osthol, an active component of Du Huo, can inhibit acetic acid-induced pain, and carrageenin-induced edema in the hind legs. (17)

Anti-cancer effect

Research shows that furocoumarin, a chemical isolated from active components of Du Huo, inhibits cancer cells. (18)

References

  1. Lu Wei Lu. Journal of Guiyang College of TCM. 1992;14(1)44.
  2. Li Rong Zhi, et al. Journal of Pharmacy. 1989;24(7):546-551.
  3. Pan Jing Xian. Journal of Pharmacy. 1987;22(5):380-384.
  4. Wang Zhi Xue, et al. Journal of Shengyang College of Pharmacy. 1988;5(3):183-188.
  5. Chen Xuan Xuan, et al. Journal of Nanjing College of Pharmacy. 1986;17(4):252-255.
  6. Zhou Chen Ming, et al. Journal of Chinese Materia Medica. 1990;13(8):28-32.
  7. Wu Qing Fu, et al. Journal of Chinese Herbal Medicine. 1993;24(1):3, 48.
  8. Rao Gao Xiong, et al. Journal of Natural Products Research & Development. 1995;7(2):16-18.
  9. Rao Gao Xiong, et al. China Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1996;21(8):482-483.
  10. Rao Gao Xiong, et al. China Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1996;21(8):482-483.
  11. Zhang Han Qing, et al. Journal of Chinese Herbal Medicine. 1992;23(10):515-516, 554.
  12. Lu Wei Lu. Journal of Guiyang College of TCM. 1992;14(1)44.
  13. Meng Juan Lu, et al. Journal of Chinese Herbal Medicine. 19(12):23-25.
  14. Meng Juan Lu, et al. Journal of Chinese Herbal Medicine. 19(12):23-25.
  15. Qu Ge Xia, et al. Journal of Shengyang College of Pharmacy. 1989;19(12):23-25.
  16. Wang Yu, et al. Journal of Beijing Medical University. 1986;13(1):31-36.
  17. Li Rong Zhi. Journal of Beijing Medical University. 1989;21(5):376.
  18. Liu Jiang Hua. Journal of Shengyang College of Pharmacy. 1994;11(2):143-150.