Articles

Ma Zi Ren Wan

Functions

Ma Zi Ren Wan lubricates the intestines, which then promotes bowel movement. It is primarily used to treat constipation and frequency of micturition caused by dryness and heat in the intestine and by dehydration.

Dosage Info

Oral administrations: The large honeyed pill is orally taken, 9g a time, 1 to 2 times a day, with warm boiled water. Capsules are taken 3 capsules each time, two times a day. For 5:1 concentrated extract: 9grams/day.

Ingredients

Precautions

LD50 (mice/abdominal injection): 23.01±1.40g/kg. (1)

Pharmacology

Cathartic effect: Experiments have shown that when fed to mice, Ma Zi Ren Wan can promote bowel movements in the subjects. Administered to mice by intragastric infusion, this formula at the concentrated level of 9.9% can enhance the subjects’ intestinal movement. At the concentration level of 25%, Ma Zi Ren Wan can increase both the maximum and average vibration amplitudes in isolated guinea pig ileum under normal or low temperatures. When administrated by duodenal perfusion, Ma Zi Ren Wan, when concentrated to the level of 27.9%, can increase the maximum and average vibration amplitudes in the intestine of rabbits. (2) , (3) Further, experiments have shown that the formula in pill or capsule form, can promote bowel movement in mice, and increase the contraction amplitude of rabbits’ in-vivo intestines (4) and at various doses, the formula has a cathartic effect in mice. (5) This formula also increased the water content in mice’s intestines, (6) and promoted intestinal movement in mice, rats, and rabbits. (7)

Inhibiting postoperative adhesion in the abdominal cavity: Ma Zi Ren Wan can increase the blood flow in rabbits’ anterior segmental artery of mesentery, and inhibit postoperative adhesions in mice’s abdominal cavity. (8)

Clinical Applications

Treating constipation
Qu et al. treated 172 cases of constipation with Ma Zi Ren Wan. One dose of the formula was administered twice a day. The results showed that 129 patients recovered after 3 doses, and the remaining 43 patients recovered after 4 to 9 doses. (9)

Qu et al. treated 172 cases of constipation with Ma Zi Ren Wan. One dose of the formula was administered twice a day. The results showed that 129 patients recovered after 3 doses, and the remaining 43 patients recovered after 4 to 9 doses. (10)

Deng et al. used Ma Zi Ren Wan to treat 54 cases of postoperative constipation in patients who underwent complete hysterectomy and vaginal surgery. The formula was washed down with the decoction of Bai Shao (White Peony) half an hour before or after breakfast and supper. The patients took the formula for 3 to 4 days. The results were that 52 patients defecated within 24 hours, and the remaining 2 patients did so within 48 hours. (11)

Luo treated 50 cases of habitual constipation in the elderly with modified Ma Zi Ren Wan. The modified formula consisted of Ma Zi Ren (Hemp Seed), Yu Li Ren (Bush-cherry Seed), Gua Lou Ren (Trichosanthes Seed), Bo Zi Ren (Arborvitae Seed), Tian Hua Fen (Trichosanthes Root), Mai Dong (Ophiopogon Root), Dong Gua Ren (Benincasa Seed), Lu Gen (Reed Rhizome), Ge Gen (Pueraria Root), Da Huang (Rhubarb), and Gan Cao (Licorice). One course of treatment called for 3 doses to be administered. The results confirmed that the treatment was effective in all 50 cases. Some patients experienced complete relief after taking as few as three doses of the formula. (12)

Zheng et al. treated 60 cases of habitual constipation with the combined formula of Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang and Ma Zi Ren Wan. The patients were administered one dose of the combined formula in a decoction daily (15ml of honey was added to the decoction). One course of treatment lasted 5 to 10 days. After treatment, 45 cases were resolved, 10 cases improved, and the remaining 5 cases did not respond to the treatment, with a total effectiveness rate of 91.7%. (13)

Wu et al. treated 80 cases of constipation caused by neuroleptics. The patients originally took the formula in the decoction form, and then changed to the pill form after the symptoms had been alleviated. After treatment, 62 cases were resolved, another 13 cases improved, and the remaining 5 cases did not respond to the treatment, with a total effectiveness rate of 93.75%. (14)

Treating micturition

Wu treated three cases of frequency of micturition with Ma Zi Ren Wan plus Fu Pen Zi (Raspberry) and Sang Piao Xiao (Mantis Egg-shell) and reported satisfactory results. (15) Similarly, Xi treated frequency of micturition with modified Ma Zi Ren Wan, and achieved satisfactory results. (16)

Treating DiabetesRen treated 15 cases of diabetes with modified Ma Zi Ren Wan. The modified formula consisted of Ma Zi Ren (Hemp Seed), Bai Shao (White Peony Root), Xin Ren (Bitter Apricot Seed), Zhi Shi (Immature Bitter Orange), Hou Pu (Magnolia Bark), Huang Jin (Siberian Solomonseal Rhizome), Sheng Di Huang (dried Rehmannia Root), Shan Yao (Chinese Yam), Tian Hua Fen (Trichosanthes Root), and Da Huang (Rhubarb). One dose of the formula in decoction was administered twice daily. The results showed that 9 cases were resolved, another 5 cases showed great improvement, and the remaining case did not respond to the treatment, with a total effectiveness rate of 93%. (17)

References

  1. Zhou Jiu Yao, et al. The effect of Ma Ren Run Chang Kou Fu Ye on bowel movement. Journal of Guangzhou University of TCM. 1996;13(2):36-39.
  2. Peng Zhi Pei, et al. The effects of Ma Ren Wan and Guo Dao Pian in promoting bowel movement. Journal of Hunan College of TCM. 1992;12(3):44-47.
  3. Guo Jian Sheng, et al. Ma Zi Ren Wan’s effect in relieving constipation. China Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1993;18(4):236-239.
  4. Qiu Sai Hong, et al. The effect of Ma Zi Ren Wan and Ma Ren Capsules in relieving constipation. Journal of Pharmacology and Clinical Application of TCM. 1990;6(6):5-6.
  5. Feng Han Ge, et al. Ma Ren Pian vs. Ma Ren Wan. Journal of Shizhen Medicinal Material Research. 1992;3(4):158-159.
  6. Zhou Jiu Yao, et al. The effect of Ma Ren Run Chang Kou Fu Ye on bowel movement. Journal of Guangzhou University of TCM. 1996;13(2):36-39.
  7. Chen Guang Liang, et al. The effect of Ma Ren Ru Ji and Ma Ren Wan in relieving constipation. Journal of Anhui College of TCM. 1997;16(2):52-53.
  8. Wang De Ming. Ma Ren Wang’s antagonistic effect on abdominal adhesion after abdominal cavity surgery. Journal of Pharmacy Research. 2000;24(1):43-45.
  9. Qu Zhen Ting, et al. Treating 172 cases of constipation with Ma Zi Ren Wan. Hunan Journal of TCM and Pharmacy. 1997;3(6):54.
  10. Qu Zhen Ting, et al. Treating 172 cases of constipation with Ma Zi Ren Wan. Hunan Journal of TCM and Pharmacy. 1997;3(6):54.
  11. Dun Yun Qing, et al. Treating post-total hysterectomy or -vaginal surgery constipation with Ma Zi Ren Wan and large dose of Bai Shao. Sichuan Journal of TCM. 1999;17 (9):41.
  12. Luo Qiu Bo. Treating 50 cases of senile habitual constipation with Ma Zi Ren Wan. Zhejiang Journal of Integrated Medicine. 2000;10(3):170-171.
  13. Zheng Shi Zhong, et al. Treating 60 cases of habitual constipation by replenishing qi. Journal of Applied TCM. 1999;15(9):23.
  14. Wu Ji Han, et al. Treating 80 cases of neuroleptics-induced constipation with Ma Zi Ren Wan. Sichuan Journal of TCM. 1996;14(9):29.
  15. Wu Xiao Bo. Treating micturition with Ma Zi Ren Wan. Shanghai Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Herbs. 1985;3(4):19.
  16. Xi Bao Shi. Treating micturition with modifications of Ma Zi Ren Wan. Bulletin of Correspondence College of TCM. 1988;7(2):25.
  17. Ren Ping An. Treating 15 cases of diabetes with modified Ma Zi Ren Wan. Shaanxi Journal of TCM. 1992;13(11):511.